Haenel Model-100 Repeater  

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Garvin2
(@garvin2)
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15th December 2017 21:29  

Haenel Model-100 Repeater.

 

With thanks to Bruce Jr for this pic:

 

 

 

 

With thanks to John Z for this pic.

 

 

With thanks to Trev A for this pic:

 

 

 

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Garvin2
(@garvin2)
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15th December 2017 21:30  

Haenel Model-100 Repeater - Instruction Tag.

 

With thanks to Bruce Jr for these scans. Instructions in English and German.

Front:

 

Back:


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Garvin2
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15th December 2017 21:31  

Haenel Model-100 Repeater - Patent applied for.

 

With thanks to Sean Campbell, imaging manager of the Buffalo Bill Centre of the West in Cody, Wyoming, for permission to post this pic of a gun held in the Cody Firearms Museum. The blurb accompanying the pistol follows.

Accession Number: 1993.8.65

Date : 1875-1885

Dimensions: L: 7.5 in, H: 5.5 in

Credit Line: Gift of Thomas K. Hutchinson

Remarks: Chrome plated, brass trademarks in grip.

Inscription: top of receiver: HAENEL MOD 100 D.R.P.A. [left side of grip] HAENEL, MADE IN GERMANY [right side of grip] HAENEL, TOMES

Synopsis: firearm- pistol- airgun- Haenel, Germany- wood- brass- steel- top of receiver: HAENEL MOD 100 D.R.P.A. [left side of grip] HAENEL, MADE IN GERMANY [right side of grip] HAENEL, TOMES- Model 100- .177- Chrome plated, brass trademarks in grip.


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Garvin
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17th January 2019 16:53  

Haenel Model 100 (blued)


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Garvin
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10th June 2019 15:34  

Haenel Model-100 Repeater 

These pics copyright Holts Auctioneers









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Garvin
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28th September 2019 01:10  

Haenel Model-100 Repeater (nickel)

Pics thanks to Doug.



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Garvin
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30th September 2019 22:12  

Haenel Model-100 Repeater ads (1934-36)

 


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Garvin
(@garvin)
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18th October 2019 17:12  

Haenel model 100 DRP repeater (1935, detailed pics) 

With thanks to Doug and Frank for getting this pistol to me from the US via the Netherlands.

The first thing that strikes you about the Haenel 100 is its high quality of manufacture and careful detailing - an adult version of the 'toy' model 50.

Although in some ways it reminds you of a cheap pop-out pistol, it could hardly be further in others. It looks like it was great fun to use and the fact it was a .177 cal. (approx.) lead ball repeater must have appealed to buyers.

The quality is probably a testament to the prewar date; a time when gunsmiths still took pride in every last gun to leave the production hall and the need to shave a bit off the unit price had not begun to weigh heavily on the foremen.

The only concessions to keeping manufacturing costs down were the use of stamped metal parts for the front sight, trigger guard, and trigger.

This example has almost all of its original nickel finish and shows few signs of hard use. The cylinder stamping and date and MADE IN GERMANY stamps on the bottom of the beech(?) grips are fresh and clear.

Compared with earlier examples the grips have heat-stamped chequering and are not visibly held on with pins - an innovation that shows Haenel was still improving the pistol, despite the 'new for 1934, 1935, 1936' claims on the US ads being somewhat dubious.

The Haenel 100 was not cheap to buy, especially at the export price. At the same time in the US, a .22 cal bolt-action rifle was only a dollar or two more.

Trev Adams describes how the gun works: "To cock the model 100 one retracts the steel ring lever at the base of the grip. Its ratioed articulation allows the piston and spring to be retracted relatively easily. As this procedure occurs, a lead ball drops into the breach end of the barrel where it is held by a spring detent. When the pistol is fired, a probe on the piston-head advances the ball beyond its retainer. Then compressed air propels the missile from the barrel."


















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