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Garvin
(@garvin)
Curator in Chief Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 4676
14th December 2017 07:28  

Milbro Cougar

This topic was modified 9 months ago 2 times by Citizen K

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Garvin
(@garvin)
Curator in Chief Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 4676
14th December 2017 07:28  

Milbro Cougar Air Pistol.

 

With thanks to John G for this pic.


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Garvin
(@garvin)
Curator in Chief Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 4676
14th December 2017 07:32  

Milbro Cougar Air Pistol - Boxed.

With thanks to Kev for these pics:

 


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Garvin
(@garvin)
Curator in Chief Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 4676
17th October 2019 15:00  

Milbro Cougar parts diagrams 

With thanks to John G.

 



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Garvin
(@garvin)
Curator in Chief Admin
Joined: 3 years ago
Posts: 4676
29th October 2019 16:33  

Milbro Cougar trigger improvement 

With thanks to Guy for the following description and diagrams. He says:

The Milbro Cougar is a pretty crap pistol with plenty of flaws. It is heavy, the plastic grips are made from the most brittle substance known to man and the trigger is fairly crappy. I am going to descrbe how to improve it. As with most springers, fitting a weaker or shorter mainspring will help and is not a bad idea as Cougars can deform the cylinder pin hole, like the Webley Hawks.

As the trigger housing is made of monkey metal you dont want to keep taking it off the gun and opening it up, but hopefully these tips should help you get a decent trigger.

If you remove the grips and take the housing off the cylinder, you can cock or set the trigger mechanism by lifting the top of the long sear. you can get a feel for the trigger by putting weight on this long sear with your thumb and then pulling the trigger. To open up the trigger housing there are 2 small screws on the LHS of the housing and then the LHS should lift away from the right--and hopefully not have bits flying out!
With the bits left in the RHS, you should with care, be able to lift the long sear to set the trigger and see how it works.
Ive found a lot of the problems are just the plastic part of the trigger catching on either the frame or the boss the grips screws go into (or the screws themselves) . i've labelled the bits as A, B, C, with A being the sides of the trigger , B being the 2 bosses (1 on each side) and C beng the back. if you examine these for any witness marks and then file/ sand them out of the plastic bit of the trigger, that will be a good start.

The 2nd bit is sorting the middle sear. I've found that on cocking, the lower front of the sear can touch the trigger housing, so you are in effect trying to compress metal! i think the top back of the sear can touch the pin at the back of it so I do this as well. i use an angle grinder to put a small flat on the lower front and upper back of the middle sear. I have labelled this D and E . (it should be noted that the metal is as hard as a goats arse and a pig to weld, according to Edbear, who did some work on one for me years ago)

Hopefully you should now have a half decent trigger, but if you want to go further, read on.
A metal trigger piece sits in the plastic trigger and when the trigger is pulled, it moves the metal piece, which acts on the middle sear. The problem is that if you adjust the trigger screw to make the trigger lighter, it lifts the metal trigger piece out of the plastic trigger piece and you end up with a very long first stage. It was not possible to get an adjusting screw into place in the plastic trigger, so the simple, but non adustable solution is to make a small metal wedge and glue this in to the back of the groove in the plastic trigger, so the wedge is almost touching the metal trigger piece when you have the screw wound in how you want it. I have labelled this metal wedge F.

You can fit a longer adjusting screw in for the trigger. i think it is 6BA. BUT bear in mind that you cannot get spares for these guns so if the contact points wear, you will have to get them welded up by a really good welder. ALSO by fitting a longer adjusting screw, it lifts the metal trigger piece so high that the gun wont cock unless you grind the flat bit off the top of it --or make up a trigger piece without it on. Removing this bit removes the anti bear trap element of the gun so you can decock it.

Regarding the trigger spring. it is a double leg sort of hairping spring. I only put one leg of it onto the plastic trigger and lift the other leg and rest it above the grip screw lug.
I have made up a sear spring out of piano wire, with only 2 coils instead of 6 , to make it a bit lighter. it seems to work. I have labelled the front and back legs as G and H. Watch out that the legs of this spring do not trap between the 2 sears.

Hopefully, now you know what to look for, you should be able to get a half decent trigger on your Cougar, without repeated strip downs.

 





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