BSA 1919-1939 Club Standard pattern ("CS" & "C")  

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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:11  

BSA 1919-1939 Club Standard pattern ("CS" & "C")

 


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:11  

Club Standard no.1 (c.1925) serial no. CS26496 

This rifle has a no.22 aperture sight fitted, capable of vertical adjustment but not for windage.


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:12  

Club Standard no.4 (c.1935) serial no. CS55224 

Faint traces of the original cylinder etching are visible.


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:12  

Club Standard no.1 (c.1922) serial no. CS16649 

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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:13  

Club Standard No.4 (c.1930) serial no. CS44001 

With thanks to Eddie.

Although Hiller's book states these are normally the large 45.5 inch size, you also see ones like this in the 43.25 size, with the single hole trigger block, from time to time. This gun's serial number and C.S. prefix, according to Hillers book, would normally be on a gun the larger size, yet it is the size and appearance of a later "C" prefix gun.

Single hole trigger block and CS prefix;

Piston Patent Markings;

One of the quick visual clues to a late gun....The "flat" breech top area and plain "1" barrel stamping (compare this the the earlier guns with had a more rounded appearance, "load 1 / 2" stamping, and the BSA "pylarms" logo.

Another quick visual indication of a late gun is the simplified (and cheaper to produce, both in materials and time) cocking lever pivot arrangement....a single large stepped pin, secured from the LHS by the tap retaining plate. Earlier guns had a screw threaded pivot bolt, secured by a keeper screw.

Showing the opposite side of the breech area, and the smaller diameter of the other end of the pivot pin (on earlier guns this would be a large slotted screw head, as the pivot was fitted from the opposite side;

Butt area showing the standard post WW1 (actually introduced on very late pre WW1 guns) stock bolt access cap...the grooves were cut after the caps were fitted, so a later replacement is very obvious as they never quite line up. Under this cap,if not lost over the years, is a similarly oval shaped, convex section, spring steel shim...this aids cap removal by putting pressure on the rear of the cap when the small screws are removed. A common area to find damage due to people trying to pry out these caps, which are often tight.


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:14  

Club Standard (c. 1938) serial no. C2280 

This is a scarce rifle and a variation that is seen only rarely. According to John Knibbs, 2530 guns with the 'C' prefix were made between late 1935 and 1939. The .177 cal 'C' prefix guns replaced the 'CS' prefix guns, which were made between 1930-1935.

With thanks to John for these excellent pics:


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:15  

Club Standard No.4 (c.1931 ) Serial No. CS46382 

With thanks to Lakey.

Here are a few pictures of a Club Standard No.4 Rifle (CS 46382) in .177 cal. It dates from around 1931-32, and is 43.5" in length.

The No.4 Club Standard, was designed for club target shooting, and bell target shooting.It was designed in response to a need by target shooters for a heavier .177 gun, than the 39" Light Pattern, which was seen by many as to light, and short for serious adult target shooting.The size of 43.5" closely represents the pre-WW1 Improved Model D gun in 43.25", which a lot of target shooters had got used to and many thought represented the ideal compromise length between 39" and the 45.5" sporting models.

The gun features a single hole trigger block, for the trigger pivot screw only, and had trigger adjustment made possible by a screw and locking nut through the trigger guard.

The gun had a broad trigger, much favoured by target shooters, who also thought the simplified one piece trigger made for more accurate shooting, as the point of let off could be 'felt' by a marksman who was familier with the gun, more so than the more complicated earlier two part trigger mechanism featured on the 1920's Standard's.

The stock on this gun is the later angular full pistol-grip pattern with the raised letters of "BSA" raised in the heat impressed chequering.

The breech area is similar to the earlier 1920's Standard's, however there are a few notable differences. Firstly the underlever pivot screw and locking screw have been replaced by a flat headed pin,held in position by the keyhole shaped breech plug retaining plate
Secondly, the auxilliary cocking lever was fitted with a pivot screw witha hollowed out end.
Thirdly the top of the breech loading area was machined flat instead of the radiused profile of this area on the 1920's Standard's.

On this last picture of the right hand side of the breech area, you can see the end of the large flat headed, underlever pivot pin.This pin didnt have any threads on its shank, so was free to rotate slightly everytime the gun was cocked. It is for this reason that the edge of the head of this pin usually has the blued surface worn away to the silver colour of the steel underneath.

The gun has a push button catch, to the end of the cocking lever and the spring and push botton were held in position by a little cross pin, whish you can see in the picture. Notice the perfect alignment of the underlever to the barrel. That is something to look for whish indictes that the catch and catch block are in good order and have not been replaced by none original parts.

The rearsight on this rifle is the original item and shows a large centrally mounted elevation screw with a solid centre. (The elevation screw on the similar but later airsporter and Cadet sights had a hole in the cetre of the elevation screw for a spring loaded plunger)Notice the sight base is adjustable to 50 yards.

This particular gun also has a rare B.S.A spring steel foresight protector. Notice the B.S.A "Piled Arms" trade mark on the side. This foresight protector was designed as a shoot through accessory, which could be purchased from BSA as an extra to the cost of the rifle. It is made of a single piece of thin guage spring steel, which is riveted at the front only.

This last photo shows the single rivet in its position on the sight protector. These are uncommon, and due to the thin guage of the steel used in their manufacture a lot would have rusted away or got lost during the 70-80 odd years since they were made.


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:16  

Club Standard No.4 (c.1931) serial no. CS48240 

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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:17  

Club Standard No.4 (c.1932) Serial No. CS46453 

With thanks to Lakey.

Here is an example of an early production B.S.A Club Standard No.4 dating from around 1931-32.

B.S.A introduced the Club Standard No.4 in October 1930, and early guns such as this example were fitted long tang, pressed steel trigger guards. Later No.4's were fitted with a pressed steel trigger guard that dovetailed into the rear of the trigger block

This gun is fitted with a walnut stock, and heat impressed chequering with the raised letter 'B.S.A'.The stock also features an angular semi pistolgrip, and pronounced overhang at the top of the stock to receive the web between the thumb and forefinger of the trigger hand.

The butt plate area of the stock is wood with cross hatched grooves cut across for grip. There is a small wooden cover held in place by two brass screws, which covers the hole for the stock bolt, also on this example some previous owner has carved the initial 'M' into the heel of the stock

The No.4 Club Standard was the first of the 1930's guns to revert back to a single hole trigger block with a one piece trigger and sear. Trigger adjustment was made by tightening or slackening a screw which acted directly on the trigger itself through a hole in the front of the trigger guard. The adjustment screw was then secured by tightening up a lock nut on the screw shaft.

You can see the No.4 Club standard, had a very broad trigger, which was a help in accurate target shooting, however it must be assumed that BSA dropped the adjustable trigger of the earlier Standards as a cost cutting measure. The single piece trigger/sear and single hole trigger block handn't been seen since the last of the Improved model D's stopped production the 1914.

Moving onto the breech area, you can see that the underlever pivot screw had by now been relaced by a flat headed pin. This pin doesn't have any thread and is held in place by the keyhole shaped loading tap plate. It is free to turn and often you see a lighter coloured band around the flattened head - where the bluing has been worn away by contact with the tap plate.This lighter band is visible on this example.

On the upper surface of the breech area, you have the loading hole, and the area around that hole is now flat, rather that radiused as in the case of the earlier guns. The piled arms logo behind the rear site is now missing, and the only marking in that area is the number '1' denoting No.1 bore (.177 cal)

The rear sight fitted to the Club standard had a wide piller base, with a central elevation screw and a moving bar, usually fitted with a wide 'V', although other bar configurations such as a 'U' or shallow 'V' could be ordered at the time of purchase. You can see the wear on the rearsight fitted to this example, and the elevation bar is snapped at its weak point in line with the base of the 'V'. The sight has graduated marks up to 50 yds range on its left hand side, the right hand side of the sight is plain and unmarked.

The foresight on the Standards was a high bead forsight with the bead overhanging the rear surface of the sight. It was fitted into a dovetail on the barrel, and could be adjusted for windage by tapping it lightly to move it right or left in the dovetail

Notice also the careful finish and profile applied to the crown of the muzzle, which undoubtedly help the accuracy of these fine guns.

Many No.4 Club Standards were fitted with an optional peep or Aperture sight which was inlet into the top of the wooden stock. This gun has a No.21 sight fitted. It folds up nearly flush with the stock when not in use enabling the ordinary rearsight to be used. In fact it could be possible to set the two sights for different ranges, so that you could use the middle sight for close and medium ranges and the aperture sight for longer ranges.

The cocking lever, on the number 4 Club Standard was held against the barrel with an end button catch, and the other end was held between two posts or trunions where the smooth pin acted as the pivot. If the cocking lever is raise you can see various inspection stamps applied to the metal with heavy punches at the time of manufacture.

Finally, I hope you have enjoyed the pictures and I leave you with one last shot of B.S.A Club Standard No.4, Serial No. CS 46453


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:17  

Club Standard no.4 (c.1935) serial no. CS53448 

With thanks to a collector friend for letting me photograph this beautiful example. Note the original fore sight protector.


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Garvin
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18th December 2017 16:19  

Club Standard no.1 (1922) serial no. CS13779 

With thanks to Eddie.

Actually dispatched 10th November 1922, this is the very first Club air rifle to leave the Birmingham factory. I found this out from a fellow collector by asking on another forum as the serial number was lower than I had seen in the past.

Unfortunately (to traditional collectors) the gun has re-finished in the past, and a scope rail added, but it is in good order and shoots really well and powerfully, so I thought it was worthy of adding here due to the fact it is so early an example.

Whole gun;

Stock LHS;

Stock RHS;

Pivot screw area;

Tap area;

Three whole block;

Cylinder and Weaver 6x scope;

Scope rail detail;

That serial number;


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Garvin
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23rd July 2018 01:05  

Club Standard (c. 1936) serial no. C606

With thanks to Dave R for these pics. Dave adds: "PS: note the 2 inches of 10mm light rubber cord in the aux lever slot. This I add to take out the rattle when cocked and ready to shoot."

 

This post was modified 5 months ago by Garvin

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